Tag Archives: The Northern Agrarian

Life cycles

The miracle of a butterfly is a cliché, but it’s a miracle my daughter, who is four, hadn’t yet witnessed, and she gave me daily — if not hourly — updates on the caterpillar’s progress. And, really, it’s a miracle that never grows old. When the aptly named “Parsley” went off into the wide world we were all a little disappointed that we wouldn’t see her emerge as a butterfly. Continue reading

Posted in Essays | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

On grass

Originally published in the Northern Agrarian, July/August 2008. My back yard has never been in danger of winning any awards from glossy design magazines. Plantain rules a few patches where I let the ducks graze too freely. The old garden … Continue reading

Posted in Essays | Tagged , | Leave a comment

On growing potatoes

Originally published in the Northern Agrarian. When I write about gardening I sometimes, without meaning to, give the impression that I wake every morning to survey a vast domain of neatly tilled beds and a refrigerator bursting with home-grown produce. … Continue reading

Posted in Essays | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Beet greens

Originally published in The Northern Agrarian, May 2008. When I was young my parents tended a small garden: Peas, tomatoes, lettuce, parsley, zucchini, beets. All this in the small backyard of a small house in a medium-sized northern town, sheltered … Continue reading

Posted in Essays | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wildflowers

Originally published in The Northern Agrarian, April 2008. In the woods behind my house is a clump of daffodils. Each year they emerge with the first false temptations of spring and for a few brief weeks throw bright yellow sparks … Continue reading

Posted in Essays | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment