Tag Archives: Pennsylvania Dutch

Further perils of authenticity

Completely by accident awhile back I ran across this ad from Life magazine: Heinz ran that ad in August 1958, at the height of the popular interest in Pennsylvania Dutch food, when that cuisine was being made over in the … Continue reading

Posted in Impressions | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Frugal celebrations

Funny how some things we traditionally do to mark the new year are long-term resolutions, while others are one-off celebrations. Eating right and working out? Oh, we’re going to do that every day. (What’s that? We said the same thing … Continue reading

Posted in Impressions | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Enter the Belsnickel

The story of the Krampus has been making the rounds lately. For those who haven’t heard, he’s an old-world Germanic mythical creature who terrorizes naughty children at Christmas. Apparently pepper-spray-wielding shoppers at Target aren’t scary enough for Americans these days, … Continue reading

Posted in Essays | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Lemon sponge pie

Tonight we bring you the lemon sponge pie, a delicious, odd, and mostly-forgotten pie that separates into layers as it bakes — one custardy, one cakey — and makes lemon meringue weep. (Which it often does, in any case.)

Posted in Receipts | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Damp bottom shoofly pie

There are two types of shoofly pie, wet bottom and damp or dry bottom. Both feature a molasses custard with a crumb topping; the only difference is the consistency of the molasses filling. The drier versions can be eaten by … Continue reading

Posted in Receipts | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Prayers for rain

On a trip to Pennsylvania in late June I bought the finishing touch for our duck pen: a hex sign. It bears an eight-point star and rosette, for fertility, surrounded by raindrops. The fertility wishes, needless to say, are for … Continue reading

Posted in Observances | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Bustling

Central Market on a busy day bustles, a word we don’t use much anymore but which seems to describe an ideal city scene, crowds smoothly mingling in purposeful activity, not frenetic or restless but businesslike in a friendly way. That … Continue reading

Posted in Observances | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment